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Module 6: Erasing the barriers to communications

 

Erasing the barriers to communications... Touch for sighted friends and family
Being able to join in with your sighted friends and family has never been easier. As simple as 1-2-3 a sighted user can interact with the Touch without knowing any or little knowledge of Braille. Learn how to use the Braillenote Touch in situations where sighted friends wish to use the Braillenote Touch to show you their favourite YouTube video or a family member wanting to help with your homework, but both do not have any prior knowledge of Braille.

Benefits for the learner
When communication is effective, both the student and the teacher benefit. Communication makes learning easier, helps students achieve goals, increases opportunities for expanded learning, strengthens the connection between student and teacher, and creates an overall positive experience. This will allow the learner to Interact with friends, family and teachers, get instant written feedback or be directed to websites and apps.

Benefits for the Teachers / Parents / TVI
When it comes to new technology, many people are often afraid to learn a new device, or they do not have time to learn it. Being able to switch of the accessibility feature of KeySoft on the BrailleNote Touch will allow anyone to use the BrailleNote Touch like any other tablet. Using the standard gestures of swiping up and down and select an application with the use of one finger, teachers, parents and friends can also enjoy using the BrailleNote Touch. Turning the BrailleNote Touch into a standard tablet will allow for a teacher or a member of the IT department set up the internet or for even given instant feedback on the BrailleNote Touch, using the onboard QWERTY keyboard. The best part is you do don’t have to know braille to use the BrailleNote Touch.

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1. Methods of input and interaction

2. Calibrating the touchscreen for touch input

3. Turning the visual display on and off

4. Generating a visual document preview

5.. Turning the KeySoft accessibility on and off

6. Using the Touch with KeySoft turned off

7. Using Explore by Touch mode

8. Sharing a file

9. Using voice search

10. Using TouchBraille mode

1. Methods of input and interaction

The BrailleNote Touch offers three methods of input and interaction with the product. This makes the product very flexible and powerful, as users can input and interact according to their preference.

The three main methods of input and interaction are as follows:

  • Using your fingers on the touchscreen – this is used for typing text into applications, as well as for navigation and control of the device
  • Using the physical Braille keyboard – this is used for typing text into applications, as well as for navigation and control of the device
  • Using Google Now’s voice input – this is mainly used for speaking information that you want to look up, for example to search for something on the internet

By default, the KeySoft accessibility is turned on and enabled on the BrailleNote. This means that speech and Braille output are available. It is possible to turn KeySoft off, which will disable speech and Braille and allow the BrailleNote tablet to be used as a standard tablet for sighted people.

Using your fingers on the touchscreen

You can use your fingers on the BrailleNote’s touchscreen. The touchscreen is sensitive to touch input, and supports standard gestures such as tapping, long pressing, pinching and zooming.

There are two distinct modes of operation that the BrailleNote can use, which affects how you interact with the touchscreen. These are as follows:

  • TouchBraille mode
  • Explore by Touch mode

TouchBraille mode creates a virtual onscreen Braille keyboard, which you can use to input text into applications, as well as navigating through menus and selecting items. Please refer to “Using TouchBraille Mode” for more information.

Explore by Touch mode allows you to use various touchscreen gestures to interact with and control the device. For example, you can navigate through the items in a menu or dialog box. When you are using Explore by Touch mode, there is no virtual onscreen Braille keyboard. Please refer to “Using Explore by Touch” for more information.

Note: When you are in any situation where you are able to, or have to input text into an application on the BrailleNote, you will automatically be switched into TouchBraille mode, which will allow you to use the virtual onscreen Braille keyboard. Explore by Touch mode will be unavailable at this point.

If you are using Explore by Touch mode, and you encounter a situation where you need to input text, such as creating a new document or moving to an input field on a webpage, the BrailleNote will automatically switch you into TouchBraille mode, so you can use the virtual Braille keyboard. Once you are no longer in the text input situation, the BrailleNote will automatically switch you back into Explore by Touch mode – the BrailleNote remembers your current setting.

Toggling between TouchBraille mode and Explore by Touch mode

There is a quick way to toggle your interaction mode between TouchBraille and Explore by Touch – press and release both the Previous (far left) thumb key and the

Next (far right) thumb key at the same time.

If you were using TouchBraille mode and you perform this action, you will be prompted “TouchBraille Off”, which indicates that you are now using Explore by Touch mode.

This message will also appear briefly in text on the screen, and a visual “T” will stay displayed on the screen (just above Braille cell 11) to indicate that Explore by Touch mode is active.

If you were using Explore by Touch mode and you perform this action, you will be prompted “TouchBraille On“, which indicates that you are now using TouchBraille mode.

This message will also appear briefly in text on the screen, and a visual “B” will stay displayed on the screen (just above Braille cell 11) to indicate that TouchBraille mode is active.

Using the physical Braille keyboard

The BrailleNote comes with a physical Braille keyboard, which you can connect into the device via the port on the back.

When the physical Braille keyboard is connected into the BrailleNote, this sets the interaction mode to TouchBraille.

Note: TouchBraille mode gives support for the virtual onscreen Braille keyboard without the physical Braille keyboard attached, as well as use of the physical Braille keyboard).

Using Google Now’s voice input

The BrailleNote uses the Android operating system software. Android comes with Google Now preinstalled. Google Now is a powerful feature which allows you to speak information into the device to perform searches and other functions.

Refer to “Using voice search” for detailed guidance on using the Google Now feature.

2. Calibrating the touchscreen for touch input

The BrailleNote’s touchscreen can be used for touch input, where you use your fingers to touch the screen and perform actions, including Braille input, control and navigation.

The touchscreen supports the use of all ten fingers. The number of fingers you use will depend on your current interaction mode, whether it is TouchBraille or Explore by Touch. Refer to the specific guides for full information on using the two modes.

To initially calibrate the touchscreen for touch input, after turning the BrailleNote on, rest your wrists on the front edge of your BrailleNote, just below the braille display, until you find a position comfortable for typing, while keeping your fingers slightly above the screen. Then, place all ten fingers on your screen until you feel a short vibration. This vibration indicates that your BrailleNote is calibrated to your fingers’ position. After feeling the calibration vibration, lift your fingers slightly off the screen and at this point, you can type on your screen the same way you would type with a traditional physical braille keyboard, with the added advantage that TouchBraille is almost completely silent, and you do not need to raise your fingers much off the screen as there is barely any force required to type with TouchBraille.

Note that you can use any of the screen area – you are not limited to the area of the screen that shows visual output. The location that you use on the touchscreen to place your fingers will be used for the virtual Braille keyboard.

Note: If you attempt to calibrate the touchscreen, and you feel a long vibration instead of the expected short vibration, this means that the calibration was unsuccessful. If this happens, simply lift your fingers so they are no longer touching the screen, then place them down on the screen and try to calibrate again.

Useful tip: If you are still unable to calibrate even after multiple attempts, lift your fingers so they are removed from the screen. Place both your palms flat onto the screen, then remove them from the screen. Then, try the regular calibration with all your fingers again.

The BrailleNote is very good at keeping the touchscreen calibrated. However, if you remove your fingers from the screen for a longer time, or you want to change the typing position of your fingers, you will need to recalibrate the touchscreen.

3. Turning the visual display on and off

The Touch has an inbuilt visual display which makes it easy and simple for a sighted person to view the activity on the device. The touchscreen is used for the visual display output. There may be times when the Touch user wants privacy and does not want the visual output to be shown. The Touch provides a quick command which you can use to toggle the visual display output on and off.

To toggle the visual display on and off, press and hold the Next (far right) thumb key. With this thumb key held down, press and release the Space bar. You can then release the Next thumb key.

When you turn the visual display on, you will be prompted “Visual display on”.

When you turn the visual display off, you will be prompted “Visual display off”.

4. Generating a visual document preview

When you are working in a document, there may be occasions where you want to show the document to a sighted teacher or colleague. The visual document preview feature is very useful for this, as it shows the document as it will appear when printed or viewed on a standard computer. The visual preview will show all the visual formatting of your document.

You may also notice black boxes and shapes on the touchscreen of the BrailleNote whilst working in a document. These boxes and shapes represent Braille format markers designed for the Braille reader, and these cannot be translated into a visual representation. The visual document preview is really useful for understanding how these format markers will translate to the printed version (and also to how the document will display on a standard computer).

To generate a visual document preview, follow these steps;

With your document open in the Word Processor, use the Braille shortcut Enter with V.

The Touch will now generate a temporary PDF version of your document, which will be displayed on the screen. This will show the document as it would appear when printed, with all visual formatting.

Note: With the visual PDF preview open, you have the option to switch to Explore by Touch mode and then use touchscreen gestures to pan and magnify the document.

To switch to Explore by Touch mode, press and release the Previous (far left) thumb key and the Next (far right) thumb key at the same time. You will be prompted “TouchBraille off”.

You can then pan around the visual PDF preview using one finger on the screen. You can change the magnification level using two finger pinch and zoom gestures.

To close the visual document preview, use the Braille shortcut Space with E, or press and release the Back button.

Note: If you switched to Explore by Touch mode whilst you were using the visual document preview, you will automatically be switched back into TouchBraille mode for working your document itself.

5. Turning the KeySoft accessibility on and off

The BrailleNote Touch comes with the KeySoft accessibility software inbuilt into the device. By default, KeySoft is turned on and this gives you speech and Braille output, which makes the Touch a fully accessible Braille tablet.

It is possible to turn the KeySoft accessibility feature off, which will disable speech and Braille. This action is useful as it allows a sighted person to use the Touch and perform actions on it using standard touchscreen gestures and commands which are the same as the ones used on various smartphones and tablets.

For example, a student who uses the BrailleNote Touch wants to access the internet at their school. The student can turn KeySoft off, and then give the tablet to the sighted IT team who can then configure the Touch with the school’s wireless network, in the same way as they would do for a standard Android device. After doing this, they can then give the Touch back to the student, who can turn KeySoft back on and then use the internet with speech and Braille support.

There is a quick way to turn the KeySoft accessibility on and off. You can do this by pressing and releasing the Home button three times in quick succession.

Note that if you have an application open and you turn KeySoft back on, you will be exited from the application that you were using. One way to prevent this is to instead turn KeySoft back on by using the alternative action – press and release both the Previous (far left) thumb key and the Next (far right) thumb key at the same time. This will enable KeySoft and keep you in your current application.

When you turn KeySoft off, you will be prompted “Disabling KeySoft”. Braille and speech support will be disabled at this point.

When you turn KeySoft on, you will be prompted “Enabling KeySoft”. Braille and speech output will be enabled again at this point.

6. Using the Touch with KeySoft turned off

The Touch can be used with KeySoft turned off. In this state, the touchscreen can be used by a sighted person. There will be no speech or Braille feedback, and the Braille keyboard and Braille display cannot be used.

The main purpose for turning KeySoft off is to allow a sighted person, such as a teacher or an IT person, to set up WiFi connections, email accounts and other accounts and settings on the Touch, without the need to understand how KeySoft works on the device. In other cases parents are also able to interact with the device having little or no prior experience of Braille, this allows the parent to help their child in common scenarios such as help in browsing the internet and the checking of work.

With KeySoft turned off, the Touch becomes a regular Android tablet device. All of the standard Android touchscreen gestures and actions can be used, in the same way as you can on mainstream Android tablets and smartphones.

Some of the common gestures and actions are as follows:

To scroll the current menu or screen downwards, swipe upwards with one finger on the touchscreen.

To scroll the current menu or screen upwards, swipe downwards with one finger on the touchscreen.

To select an item, such as an option in a menu or list, or activate an element such as a button or link on a webpage or other application, tap with one finger on the item or element’s name on the touchscreen.

To move to the next screen to the right of your current one in an application, swipe from right to left with one finger on the touchscreen.

To move to the previous screen to the left of your current one in an application, swipe from left to right with one finger on the touchscreen.

To open the Notifications area, swipe down with one finger from near the top left corner of the touchscreen.

To open the Quick Settings menu, swipe down with one finger from near the top right corner of the touchscreen.

Note that you can open an application by tapping its’ name on the touchscreen.

When you encounter a situation where you have to input information, such as the wireless key field when setting up a WiFi connection, the onscreen visual Android keyboard will appear and you can tap the relevant keys to input characters.

7. Using Explore by Touch mode

Explore by Touch is the second mode of interaction that you can use on the BrailleNote Touch. In general, it will be the less commonly used method, compared to the TouchBraille mode.

Explore by Touch mode allows you to navigate through the BrailleNote using finger gestures on the touchscreen. These gestures are similar to the ones you would use when navigating a traditional tablet or smartphone and using a screenreader, such as iOS on Apple devices and TalkBack on Android devices.

Note: Explore by Touch mode can only be used when you are navigating menus, lists and other applications. It cannot be used when you are in a situation where you can input text, such as inside a document in KeyWord, or in a text input field on a webpage.

On traditional tablets and smartphones, it is possible to bring up a visual onscreen computer style keyboard that you can use to input text. The Touch does not have this type of keyboard. There is however the virtual onscreen Braille keyboard, which you can use when in TouchBraille mode – refer to “Using TouchBraille mode” for guidance on using the virtual Braille keyboard.

Selecting Explore by Touch mode

When Explore by Touch mode is active, a visual letter T will be displayed in the bottom left corner of the touchscreen. You will always be using either Explore by Touch or TouchBraille mode.

If you are currently using TouchBraille mode, you can quickly switch to Explore by Touch mode by pressing and releasing both the Previous (far left) thumb key and Next (far right) thumb key at the same time. You will be prompted “TouchBraille off”, and the visual letter T will be displayed on the touchscreen.

Note: If you are using Explore by Touch mode, and you encounter a situation where you have to input text, such as creating a new KeyWord document, moving to a text input field on a webpage, or creating a new email and going to the message body, the Touch will automatically switch you into TouchBraille mode and you will be prompted “Edit mode”. This will give you use of the virtual Braille keyboard, or the physical Braille keyboard if you have connected it.

When you leave the situation where you are inputting text, the Touch will automatically switch you back into Explore by Touch mode.

If you are using Explore by Touch mode, and you connect the physical Braille keyboard into the Touch and flip it down over the screen, you will be automatically be switched into TouchBraille mode. Note that you could lift the physical Braille keyboard up from the screen, and temporarily switch to Explore by Touch mode if you wish to do so. When you want to flip the Braille keyboard back down onto the screen, you will need to switch back to TouchBraille mode.

Starting to use Explore by Touch mode

Once you have selected Explore by Touch mode, you do not have to calibrate the touchscreen in order to start using it.

Using Explore by Touch mode

Explore by Touch mode gives you the use of gestures that tablet and smartphone users will be familiar with.

There are references below to some general gestures – swipe, tap and slide.

A swipe refers to placing your finger(s) on the touchscreen and then quickly swiping them in the specified direction. When using a swipe gesture, your finger(s) stay on the screen only very briefly.

A tap refers to quickly tapping and releasing your finger(s) on the touchscreen. You can tap anywhere on the visible area of the touchscreen.

A slide refers to placing your finger(s) on the touchscreen and then moving them in the specified direction. When using a slide gesture, your finger(s) stay on the screen a little longer than when using a swipe gesture.

Note that when you are using Explore by Touch mode, you can still use the Braille thumb keys for navigation.

General navigation

You can easily navigate through the items on the screen within the application you are currently using. The best way to start using Explore by Touch mode is to simply touch anywhere on the screen with one finger. The item displayed underneath your finger will be selected. This item will be read out in speech by the Touch, and the item’s name will also be displayed in Braille.

If you want to simply go through the items on the screen, slide with one finger on the screen in the desired direction.

If you want to quickly jump to the next or previous item, you can do so as described below.

To navigate to the next item on the screen (menu, list or application), swipe right with one finger on the touchscreen.

Alternatively, press and release the Next (far right) thumb key.

Note that if the current item’s name does not fill the Braille display, you can also move to the next item by pressing and releasing the Advance (inner right) thumb key.

To navigate to the previous item on the screen (menu, list or application), swipe left with one finger on the touchscreen.

Alternatively, press and release the Previous (far left) thumb key.

Note that if the current item’s name does not fill the Braille display, you can also move to the previous item by pressing and releasing the Back (inner left) thumb key.

If you reach the end or beginning of a list when using the thumb keys, you will hear an audio sound which alerts you of this. If you reach the top of a list, you will be prompted “Top” in Braille. If you reach the bottom of a list, you will be prompted “Bottom” in Braille.

The Touch allows looping through lists and menus. If you are currently positioned on the first item in a list or menu, moving to the previous item will position you on the item at the end of the list / menu.

If you are currently positioned on the last item in a list or menu, moving to the next item will

position you on the item at the start of the list / menu.

If there are a large number of items in the list, menu or application you are using, the visual screen will not be able to show them all. In this case, you can scroll the screen to change the viewable list of items.

To scroll through a list of items, slide with two fingers on the touchscreen. The scrolling action uses an inverse slide gesture.

To scroll upwards through a list of items, slide downwards with two fingers on the touchscreen.

To scroll downwards through a list of items, slide upwards with two fingers on the touchscreen.

To select an item so that your position and focus is moved to it, simply touch the item’s name with one finger on the touchscreen.

To activate / action the item that is currently selected (the item that you are positioned on), double tap the touchscreen with one finger. Alternatively, press a cursor routing button above any of the letters in the item’s name on the Braille display.

To long press an item, double tap and hold with one finger on the touchscreen. The long press is often used to access additional actions or options for an item.

8. Sharing a file

With software version 1.01 and later, you can now use the Share option to share a file with any supported application on your Touch. The Share option is used in the File Manager application. This has the advantage that you can share a file by selecting it, rather than having to open the desired application manually and then select the file there.

Note that you can share most files using the Share option in File Manager. This applies to Word documents you have created using the Word Processor, as well as PDF files, and so on. As an example, you can create a Word document in the Word Processor, and then use the Share option to upload it to your Google Drive cloud storage.

To share a file, follow these steps;

Press and release the Home button, or use the Braille shortcut Space with dots 1,2,3,4,5 and 6, to go to the Main Menu.

From the Main Menu, type a letter F. You will be prompted “File Manager, KeyFiles”. Now, press Enter.

You will be placed in the File Manager. Your position at this point depends on the last file / folder you have been working with on your Touch.

Press Space with D. You will be prompted “Drive selection, storage”. Press Space with dot 4 or Space with dot 1 until you reach the drive that contains the file that you want to share, and then press Enter.

You will be prompted with the name of the first folder in the list for the selected drive. Press Space with dot 4 or Space with dot 1 until you reach the folder that contains the file that you want to share, and then press Enter.

Note: You can make use of first letter navigation in the folder list if desired.

You will be prompted with the name of the first file in the list for the selected folder. Note that if the file you want to share is in a subfolder, you will need to select the subfolder first to open the list of files / folders within that.

Now, press Space with dot 4 or Space with dot 1 until you reach the file that you want to share.

Note: You can make use of first letter navigation in the file list if desired.

Press and release the Contextual Menu button, or use the Braille shortcut

Space with M, to open the Contextual Menu. You will be prompted “Context menu…”.

Type a letter S. You will be prompted “Share”. Now, press Enter.

You will be prompted “Android system”. You are now placed in a list of supported applications that you can share your file with. Press Space with dot 4 or Space with dot 1 until you reach the desired application, and then press Enter. You may need to press Enter again to proceed.

The next steps depend on the specific application that you have chosen to use to share your file.

9. Using voice search

The Touch supports the use of voice search. This is inbuilt into the Android platform, and the software works in conjunction with the internal microphone to allow you to search for information and issue commands and actions using your voice.

To initiate a voice search, follow these steps:

Press and hold the Home button. You will be prompted “Android system. Google”. Press Enter to select Google. You may need to press Enter again to proceed.

You will be prompted “Google app”. Type a letter V.

You will be prompted “Voice search button”. Press Enter.

You will hear a short sound from your Touch. Voice search is now active, and you can now speak into the Touch. Note that the microphone is located just underneath the right hand speaker – the closer you are to the microphone when you speak into the Touch, the better the recognition will be.

The Touch will now attempt to interpret what you have said, and it will then perform either an action directly and then offer you options relating to that action, or you will be offered a list of items to move through. At a general level, your spoken words can be interpreted as either a direct request to perform an action, for example “set alarm for 10pm”, or a general request for information, such as “BrailleNote” which will initiate a Google web search for the word “BrailleNote”.

10. Using TouchBraille mode

TouchBraille is the most common mode of interaction that you will generally use on the BrailleNote Touch. TouchBraille is one mode, with the other being Explore by Touch mode. Refer to “Using Explore by Touch mode” for guidance on using Explore by Touch mode.

TouchBraille mode offers you a very intuitive and efficient method of input, navigation and actions on the Touch. In TouchBraille mode, navigation and actions are performed using a variety of keyboard shortcuts and first letter navigation.

Selecting TouchBraille mode

When TouchBraille mode is active, a visual letter B will be displayed in the bottom left corner of the touchscreen. You will always be using either TouchBraille or Explore by Touch mode.

If you are currently using Explore by Touch mode, you can quickly switch to TouchBraille mode by pressing and releasing both the Previous (far left) thumb key and Next (far right) thumb key at the same time. You will be prompted “TouchBraille on”, and the visual letter B will be displayed on the touchscreen.

Starting to use TouchBraille mode

When TouchBraille mode has been selected, you will need to calibrate the touchscreen for Braille input.

To initially calibrate the touchscreen for touch input, after turning the BrailleNote on, rest your wrists on the front edge of your BrailleNote, just below the braille display, until you find a position comfortable for typing, while keeping your fingers slightly above the screen. Then, place all ten fingers on your screen until you feel a short vibration. This vibration indicates that your BrailleNote is calibrated to your fingers’ position. After feeling the calibration vibration, lift your fingers slightly off the screen and at this point, you can type on your screen the same way you would type with a traditional physical braille keyboard, with the added advantage that TouchBraille is almost completely silent, and you do not need to raise your fingers much off the screen as there is barely any force required to type with TouchBraille.

Note that you can use any of the screen area – you are not limited to the area of the screen that shows visual output. The location that you use on the touchscreen to place your fingers will be used for the virtual Braille keyboard.

Note: If you attempt to calibrate the touchscreen, and you feel a long vibration instead of the expected short vibration, this means that the calibration was unsuccessful. If this happens, simply lift your fingers so they are no longer touching the screen, then place them down on the screen and try to calibrate again.

Useful tip: If you are still unable to calibrate even after multiple attempts, lift your fingers so they are removed from the screen. Place both your palms flat onto the screen, then remove them from the screen. Then, try the regular calibration with all your fingers again.

The BrailleNote is very good at keeping the touchscreen calibrated. However, if you remove your fingers from the screen for a longer time, or you want to change the typing position of your fingers, you will need to recalibrate the touchscreen.

Once the touchscreen has been calibrated successfully, you can start to use TouchBraille mode.

Using TouchBraille mode

TouchBraille mode applies to using the virtual Braille keyboard on the screen which you can use by tapping your fingers directly on the touchscreen. TouchBraille mode also applies to using the physical Braille keyboard.

TouchBraille mode uses the virtual Braille keyboard which you can action by tapping your fingers on the screen. During the touchscreen calibration, a virtual Braille keyboard is set up on the screen. The Braille dots are mapped to your fingers. Your furthest left finger on your left hand will be set as the Left space key, with your furthest right finger on your right hand being set as the Enter key. The three other fingers on each hand will be set as the Perkins style Braille keyboard. The Touch will use your thumbs for the Space bar – you can use either thumb to activate the Space bar key.

All references to keyboard actions and commands throughout this guide, as well as the BrailleNote Touch “how to” guides in general, will apply to both the virtual onscreen Braille keyboard, and the physical Braille keyboard.

Note: The Touch’s virtual and physical Braille keyboard works on the release of your fingers from the touchscreen / physical Braille keys. This means that you cannot hold down your fingers to perform an action repeatedly.

To type using the physical Braille keyboard, simply ensure that the Touch is in its’ case, and then ensure that the Braille keyboard is positioned down over the touchscreen. You can now use the physical Braille keyboard to navigate menus, select items, and type information into applications.

General navigation

These are some of the general commands you can use when TouchBraille mode is active.

Note that when you navigate to an item, the Touch will give you the item’s name in both speech and Braille (depending on whether your speech output is turned on).

  • To move to the next item in a menu or list, press and release the Next (far right) thumb key. Alternatively, press Space with dot 4.

Note that if the current item’s name does not fill the Braille display, you can also move to the next item by pressing and releasing the Right (inner right) thumb key

  • To move to the previous item in a menu or list, press and release the Previous (far left) thumb key. Alternatively, press Space with dot 1.

Note that if the current item’s name does not fill the Braille display, you can also move to the previous item by pressing and releasing the Left (inner left) thumb key.

  • From V4 you are now able to use the traditional keysoft navigation, Space to move forward, backspace to move back.

If you reach the end or beginning of a list when using the thumb keys, you will hear an audio sound which alerts you of this. If you reach the top of a list, you will be prompted “Top” in Braille. If you reach the bottom of a list, you will be prompted “Bottom” in Braille.

The Touch allows looping through lists and menus. If you are currently positioned on the first item in a list or menu, moving to the previous item will position you on the item at the end of the list / menu.

If you are currently positioned on the last item in a list or menu, moving to the next item will

position you on the item at the start of the list / menu.

  • To select / action the current item, press a cursor routing button above any of the letters in the item’s name on the Braille display. Alternatively, press Enter (dot 8).

 

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